Welcome
Sunday Homilies
Weekday Homilies
Funeral Homilies
Resources
Audio Homilies
Bibles
Scripture
Liturgy
Year B Homilies
Apologetics
New Releases
Lenten Books
Catholic Book Store
Bookstore
Live Church Web Cams
Fr. Nick
Humor/Stories

Your donations will help maintain the upkeep of homilies.com
Thank You!

Custom Search
Sunday Homilies - Website Links 
Sunday Homilies - Priests Personal Sites 
Sunday Homilies - Church Sites 
Non Catholic Sites 
"Rebuilt" The Number 1 Selling Book on this site 
Rebuilt: Awakening the Faithful, Reaching the Lost, and Making Church Matter

Drawing on the wisdom gleaned from thriving mega-churches and innovative business leaders while anchoring their vision in the Eucharistic center of Catholic faith, Fr. Michael White and lay associate Tom Corcoran present the compelling and inspiring story to how they brought their parish back to life.

Rebuilt: Awakening the Faithful, Reaching the Lost, and Making Church Matter is a story of stopping everything and changing focus. When their parish reached a breaking point, White and Corcoran asked themselves how they could make the Church matter to Catholics, and they realized the answer was at the heart of the Gospel. Their faithful response not only tripled their weekend mass attendance, but also yielded increased giving, flourishing ministries, and a vibrant, solidly Catholic spiritual revival. White and Corcoran invite all Catholic leaders to share the vision, borrow their strategies, and rebuild their own parishes. They offer a wealth of guidance for anyone with the courage to hear them.
 
Features & Benefits
  • Based on the authors’ successful model, weekly Mass attendance has nearly tripled during their tenure, with attendant increases in giving and service
  • Written by experienced parish leaders for parish leaders in any stage
  • Practical, no-cost, easy-to-try suggestions for all parishes: rich/poor, large/small, urban/rural
  • Brutally honest portrait of consumer culture in Catholic parishes
  
 Catholic News 
Vatican City, Apr 19, 2014 / 02:11 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- In his homily for the Easter Vigil Pope Francis encouraged those present to remember the moment they first felt the love of God, saying that Jesus' resurrection is a time to relive this experience anew.

“Returning to Galilee means treasuring in my heart the living memory of that call, when Jesus passed my way, gazed at me with mercy and asked me to follow him,” the pontiff said during the April 19 evening vigil, held every year the night before Easter as as a commemoration of Jesus' resurrection.

“It means reviving the memory of that moment when his eyes met mine, the moment when he made me realize that he loved me.”

Beginning his reflections, Pope Francis recounted the events of the Gospel, recalling how when the women come to the tomb and found it empty an angel told them to go to Galilee and tell the disciples what they saw.

He added that on their way they met Jesus, who told them to do the same and that there, “they will see me...Don't be afraid.”

Observing how “the disciples had scattered; their faith had been utterly shaken, everything seemed over, all their certainties had crumbled and their hopes had died” after Jesus' death, the Pope explained that the women's message, “incredible as it was, came to them like a ray of light in the darkness.”

After the women's testimony “The news spread: Jesus is risen as he said,” the Pope stated, drawing attention to Jesus' command for the women to return to Galilee. He noted that they “had heard it twice, first from the angel and then from Jesus himself: 'Let them go to Galilee; there they will see me.'”

“Galilee is the place where they were first called, where everything began! To return there, to return to the place where they were originally called,” he observed.

“Jesus had walked along the shores of the lake as the fishermen were casting their nets. He had called them, and they left everything and followed him.”

Returning to Galilee, the pontiff continued, “means to re-read everything on the basis of the cross and its victory without fear.”

“To re-read everything – Jesus' preaching, his miracles, the new community, the excitement and the defections, even the betrayal – to re-read everything starting from the end, which is a new beginning, from this supreme act of love.”

For each of us as well “there is a 'Galilee' at the origin of our journey with Jesus,” the Pope went on to say, expressing that this return is a beautiful rediscovery of our baptism which helps us to draw a new energy from the sources of our faith.

Returning to Galilee, he noted, “means above all to return to that blazing light with which God’s grace touched me at the start of the journey.”

“From that flame I can light a fire for today and every day, and bring heat and light to my brothers and sisters,” the Pope said, highlighting how “that flame ignites a humble joy, a joy which sorrow and distress cannot dismay, a good, gentle joy.”

Pope Francis then explained that there is “a more existential 'Galilee'” in the life of every Christian after baptism, which is “the experience of a personal encounter with Jesus Christ who called me to follow him and to share in his mission.”

Addressing those in attendance, the Roman Pontiff encouraged each to ask themselves: “What is my Galilee? Where is my Galilee? Did it go away or I remember it? Have I forgotten it? Have I gone off on roads and paths which made me forget it?”

“Lord,” he prayed, “help me: tell me what my Galilee is; for you know that I want to return there to encounter you and to let myself be embraced by your mercy.”

Emphasizing how the Easter Gospel reading is “very clear,” the Pope said that “we need to go back there, to see Jesus risen, and to become witnesses of his resurrection.”

“This is not to go back in time; it is not a kind of nostalgia,” the pontiff clarified, but rather “it is returning to our first love, in order to receive the fire which Jesus has kindled in the world and to bring that fire to all people, to the very ends of the earth.”

“'Galilee of the Gentiles!'” he concluded, “Horizon of the Risen Lord, horizon of the Church; intense desire of encounter…Let us be on our way!”

Vatican City, Apr 18, 2014 / 11:17 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his homily for Good Friday’s Passion liturgy, papal preacher Raniero Cantalamessa decried the poisonous actions of those who exploit others for financial gain, urging all to repent of their sin.

“'The love of money,' Scripture says, 'is the root of all evil,' Cantalamessa said in his April 18 homily for Good Friday, stressing that “Behind every evil in our society is money, or at least money is also included there.”

“What lies behind the drug enterprise that destroys so many human lives, behind the phenomenon of the mafia, behind political corruption, behind the manufacturing and sale of weapons, and even behind – what a horrible thing to mention – the sale of human organs removed from children?”

Continuing, the preacher highlighted that “the financial crisis that the world has gone through and that this country is still going through, is it not in large part due to the ‘cursed hunger for gold,’ the auri sacra fames, on the part of some people?”

“Judas began with taking money out of the common purse. Does this say anything to certain administrators of public funds?”

Fr. Cantalamessa is a Franciscan Capuchin Catholic Priest who was appointed as preacher of the Papal Household by Bl. John Paul II in 1980, and who therefore gives a weekly sermon during Advent and Lent in the presence of the Pope, the cardinals, bishops an prelates of the Roman Curia and the general superiors of religious orders.

Taking Judas’ betrayal of Jesus as a launching point for his reflections, Fr. Cantalamessa noted how scripture states that he “became a traitor,” and that he “was thus not born a traitor and was not a traitor at the time Jesus chose him; he became a traitor!”

Questioning those present for the liturgy inside of St. Peter’s Basilica how Judas ended up betraying Jesus, the preacher observed how some attempt to describe him as either belonging to a group of extremists or as being disappointed with Jesus’ idea of the messiah and wanting to take things into his own hands.

Although these thesis might be artistic, Fr. Cantalamessa explained that “they have no historical basis whatsoever,” and that “The Gospels – the only reliable sources that we have about Judas’ character – speak of a more down-to-earth motive: money.”

“Why are people surprised at this explanation, finding it too banal? Has it not always been this way in history and is still this way today?” he asked, adding that “Mammon, money, is not just one idol among many: it is the idol par excellence, literally ‘a molten god.’”

Emphasizing how Satan is “the true enemy” of God, the Franciscan pointed out that “no one decides to serve Satan without a motive,” and that “whoever does it does so because they believe they will obtain some kind of power or temporal benefit from him.”

“No one can serve two masters. . .You cannot serve God and mammon,” he said, quoting the Gospel of Matthew. “Money is the ‘visible god’ in contrast to the true God who is invisible.”

Fr. Cantalamessa then went on to describe how mammon is “the anti-God” because through it “Faith, hope, and charity are no longer placed in God but in money,” and that “A sinister inversion of all values occurs.”

Stressing how scripture tells us that the love of money “is the root of all evil,” the preacher highlighted that it is the underlying motive for most, if not all, criminal activity, such as the mafia, the drug enterprise and the buying and selling of weapons.

“But apart from these criminal ways of acquiring money, is it not also a scandal that some people earn salaries and collect pensions that are sometimes 100 times higher than those of the people who work for them and that they raise their voices to object when a proposal is put forward to reduce their salary for the sake of greater social justice?”

“Like all idols, money is deceitful and lying: it promises security and instead takes it away; it promises freedom and instead destroys it,” he continued, drawing attention to those “placed in positions of responsibility who no longer knew in what bank or monetary paradise to hoard the proceeds of their corruption.”

Haven’t they “found themselves on trial in court or in a prison cell just when they were about to say to themselves, ‘Have a good time now, my soul,’” Fr. Cantalamessa asked.

“For whom did they do it? Was it worth it? Did they work for the good of their children and family, or their party, if that is really what they were seeking? Have they not instead ruined themselves and others?”

On how this betrayal of Jesus still continues today, the Franciscan observed that “the one betrayed is always Jesus,” and that “Judas sold the head, while his imitators sell body, because the poor are members of the body of Christ, whether they know it or not.”

Referring to how one can betray Jesus in other ways besides these “high-profile cases,” Fr. Cantalamessa explained that “A man who betrays his wife, or a wife her husband, betrays Christ.”

“The minister of God who is unfaithful to his state in life, or instead of feeding the sheep entrusted to him feeds himself, betrays Jesus. Whoever betrays their conscience betrays Jesus.”

Drawing attention to the Gospel’s account of how Judas hanged himself after attempting to return the silver he took in exchange for hanging Jesus over, the preacher urged the congregation not to “pass a hasty judgment here.”

“Jesus never abandoned Judas, and no one knows, after he hung himself from a tree with a rope around his neck, where he ended up: in Satan’s hands or in God’s hands,” he observed, expressing “Who can say what transpired in his soul during those final moments?”

“’Friend’ was the last word that Jesus addressed to him, and he could not have forgotten it, just as he could not have forgotten Jesus’ gaze.”

Explaining how although it is true that Jesus himself said of Judas that “It would have been better for that man if he had not been born,” the eternal destiny of man “is an inviolable secret kept by God.”

What his story ought to teach us, the priest continued, is “to surrender ourselves to the one who freely forgives, to throw ourselves likewise into the outstretched arms of the Crucified One.”

“The most important thing in the story of Judas is not his betrayal but Jesus’ response to it,” Fr. Cantalamessa noted, highlighting how Jesus knew what was happening inside of his disciple, but that he did not expose it because he wanted to give Judas “the opportunity right up until the last minute to turn back.”

“He sought out Peter after his denial to give him forgiveness, so who knows how he might have sought out Judas at some point in his way to Calavary!”

“So what will we do? Who will we follow, Judas or Peter?” the Franciscan questioned those in attendance, adding that “Peter had confidence in the mercy of Christ, and Judas did not! Judas’ greatest sin was not in having betrayed Christ but in having doubted his mercy.”

Concluding his reflections, Fr. Cantalamessa encouraged attendees to be confident in the forgiveness of God, pointing out that “there is a sacrament through which it is possible to have a sure experience of Christ’s mercy: the sacrament of reconciliation.”

“How wonderful this sacrament is! It is sweet to experience Jesus as Teacher, as Lord, but even sweeter to experience him as Redeemer, as the one who draws you out of the abyss, like he drew Peter out of the sea, as the one who touches you and, like he did with the leper, says to you, ‘I will; be clean.’”

“Jesus knows how to take all our sins, once we have repented, and make them ‘happy faults,’” he explained, “faults that would no longer be remembered if it were not for the experience of mercy and divine tenderness that they occasioned.”

Vatican City, Apr 17, 2014 / 12:49 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- During his homily for Holy Thursday’s Mass at a center for disabled persons, Pope Francis reflected on how Jesus washed the feet of his disciples, calling it an act of loving service that we ought to imitate.

“He did it this way out of love. You too should love each other. Be servants in love,” the Pope said in his April 17 homily during the Mass of the Lord’s Supper.

Celebrated by the Church each year in commemoration of the institution of the Eucharist and Jesus’ call for his disciples to imitate him in serving others, this particular Mass was held in Don Gnocchi facility. Located in Rome’s Casal del Marmo area it serves as a rehabilitation center for the elderly and disabled.

Beginning his reflections, the pontiff immediately turned to the Gospel reading in which Jesus washes his disciples’ feet on his knees, explaining that this is an invitation, and telling those present that “you too should be servants, one to the other.”

Jesus’ act in washing the apostle’s feet “is a symbolic gesture,” he noted, emphasizing how “Slaves did it, servants did it.”

During that time when guests entered the house “it was necessary to wash their feet” because the streets were all made of dirt, the Pope continued, “And Jesus did this gesture, the work of a servant, of a slave.”

Highlighting how this act is a “legacy” that Jesus leaves to us, Pope Francis stated that “We should always be servants to one another,” and emphasized that it is for this reason the Church on Holy Thursday “commemorates the last supper of Jesus,” during which he institutes the Sacrament of the Eucharist.

Repeating that “We should be servants to one another,” the Roman Pontiff then explained that “Now I will do this same gesture, but all of us in our hearts think of others.”

“And we think of the love of Jesus who tells us that we should have for others. We think also how we can serve” Jesus well, “because this is what Jesus wanted for us.”

This marks the second year in a row that Pope Francis has chosen to celebrate the Mass of Our Lord’s Supper with those who are often pushed to the margins of society, having visited and washed the feet of inmates in a Roman Youth Detention Center.

Among the 12 persons whose feet the pontiff washed are nine Italians, one Muslim from Libya, a young man from Cape Verde and an Ethiopian woman who are all suffering from physical, neurological and oncological illnesses.

The youngest of those who had their feet washed is a 16-year-old youth named Oswaldinho who hails from Cape Verde and is completely paralyzed following a diving accident last summer. Not far behind Oswaldinho was 19-year-old Marco, who is a high school student and leader of his parish Youth Group, and who was diagnosed with a cerebral palsy just last year.

Eldest of the 12 was Pietro, 86, who has been a resident at the center for a year and who struggles with mobility and muscular deficiency. The second eldest was 75-year-old Hamed, who is a Muslim man originally from Libia, and who worked for the Itlian-Arab Chamber of Commerce before being involved in a traffic accident that caused serious neurological impairment.

The other eight who had their feet washed by the Pope are Orietta, 51, who suffers from an illness affecting her brain; Samuel, 66, who has had polio from his youth; Angelica, 86, the former president of Catholic Action in Italy, and has had hip replacement surgery twice; Daria, 39, has suffered with cerebral palsy from her childhood; Gianluca, 36, who from the age of 14 has undergone numerous operations as a result of meningitis; Stefano, 49, suffers from a serious cerebral and motor disorder; Giordana, 27 and from Ethiopia, suffers from cerebral palsy and epilepsy, and Walter, 59, who has Down's Syndrome.

Tomorrow, Good Friday, Pope Francis is slated to preside over Mass commemorating the Lord’s Passion in St. Peter’s Basilica at 5p.m., after which he will lead faithful in the Stations of the Cross, a prayer commemorating the last events of Jesus life before he died on the Cross, at the Coliseum at 9:15p.m.

Site Mailing List  Sign Guest Book  View Guest Book 
Go out to the whole world and proclaim the Good News

Catholic Homilies
another webiste by frnick.com