Homilies for Sunday and Weekdays of the Liturgical Year
Sunday Homilies
Salt & Light Blog
Fr. Njoku
Living Space
Oxford University
Pope John Paul II Society
Sanchez Archives
Sisters of St Joseph
Towards Wholeness
Desperate Preacher
Homiletic & Pastoral Review
Word to Life
Health Care
Tom Allain
Fr. Ron
Fr. Joku
Maryknoll
St. Joseph T.I.
New Sites
Weekday Homilies
Funeral Homilies
Live Church Web Cams
Bartlett's Quotes
Biblia Clerus
Brainy Quotes
Catholic Resources
e-sword
Faith and Films
Good Reads Quotes
Lectionary Bible Stories
Liturgy - Worship that Works
Partners in Preaching
Scripture 4 all
Stories and Illustrations
The Quote Garden
Catholic Commentary
Veritas Bible
Haydock's Commentary
Agape Bible Study
Resources
Chicago Monk
Audio Homilies
Apologetics
Bibles
Catholic Book Store
Lenten Books
Liturgy
New Releases
Scripture
Year B Homilies
Bookstore
Catholic Humor
Church Humor
Fish Eaters
Jesuit Jokes
Pastor Jokes
Pearly Gate Humor
Religious Jokes
Sermon Central
Sermon Humor
Sermon Jokes
Humor/Stories
Working Preacher
Worship & Preaching
Revised Common Lectionary Sermons
Archives - Holy Family
Newman Catholic
Fr. Altier
Sts. Simon and Jude
Blessed Sacrament
St Peter
Reason for Hope
Fr. Hansen
Fr. Greeley
Archives
Sunday Homilies 
Priest Personal Homily Sites 
Church Homily Sites 
Non Catholic Sites 

Your donations will help maintain the upkeep of homilies.com
Thank You!

Custom Search
 Sunday Homilies and Sermons 

Links to the Sunday Homilies sites are now listed in the column to the left

  
 Catholic News 

Vatican City, May 2, 2016 / 09:55 am (CNA/EWTN News).- It is the Holy Spirit who gives Christians the ability to be witnesses of the Gospel in their daily lives, Pope Francis said Monday during Mass at the Santa Marta residence's chapel. However, with that witness comes persecution.

“The Christian,  with the strength of the Spirit,” the Roman Pontiff said, “gives witness to the living Lord, to the Risen Lord, to the Lord’s presence in our midst, that the Lord celebrates with us His death, His Resurrection, each time we come to the altar.”

“The Christian too gives witness, aided by the Spirit, in his daily life, through the way in which he acts. It is the continuous witness of the Christian.  But many times this witness provokes attacks, provokes persecution.”

During his May 2 homily, Pope Francis spoke of the witness Christ shares through his Spirit, and the witness of the faithful – especially in periods of persecution.

Such persecution, he said may take the form of “little persecutions,” such as gossip and criticism, or more serious forms, such as those which “place Christians or make them even give up their lives.”

Citing Christ, the Pope said this is price of the Christian's witness: “They will expel you from the synagogues; in fact, the hour is coming when everyone who kills you will think he is offering worship to God.”

Pope Francis reflected on the day's first reading from Acts, which recounts God opening the heart of a purple-cloth dealer named Lydia, who had come to listen to St. Paul's preaching.

“This woman felt something inside her which made her say ‘this is true! And I agree with what this man says, this man who gives witness to Jesus Christ,’” the Pope said.

He asked who it was that “touched the heart of this woman,” and told her to listen to the truth?  

“It was the Holy Spirit who made this woman feel that Jesus was the Lord,” he said. “It made her know that salvation was in Paul’s words; it made this woman hear witness.  The Spirit gives witness to Jesus.”

The Roman Pontiff said every time our heart is moved to draw “closer to Jesus, it’s the Spirit which is working inside us.”

“The Holy Spirit which introduced us to Jesus,” continued Pope Francis, “is the same one who urges us to make Him known to others, not so much through words, but through living witness.”

“It is good to ask the Holy Spirit to come into our heart, to give witness to Jesus; tell Him: Lord, may I not stray from Jesus.  Teach me what Jesus taught.  Help me remember what Jesus said and did and also, help me to give witness to these things. So that worldliness, the easy things, the things that really come from the father of lies, from the prince of this world, sin, do not lead me away from giving witness.”

Vatican City, May 1, 2016 / 07:36 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Pope Francis on Sunday decried the resurgence of violence in Syria in recent days, especially in Aleppo, and renewed the call to bring about peace through dialogue.

“I receive with deep sorrow the tragic news coming from Syria, about the spiral of violence that continues to aggravate the already desperate humanitarian situation of the country,” the pontiff said May 1 after reciting the Regina Caeli address in St. Peter's Square.

Citing in particular the nation's largest city Aleppo, which has borne the brunt of the most recent violence, the Pope remembered the “innocent victims,” namely the children, the sick, and “those who with great sacrifice have pledged to help others.”

“I urge all parties to the conflict to respect the cessation of hostilities and to strengthen the ongoing dialogue, the only path that leads to peace,” he said.

Since the breaking of a ceasefire nine days ago, President Bashar Al-Assad's forces have launched against Aleppo hundreds of air and artillery strikes, as well as bombs and missals, according to The Guardian.

Reuters reports that around 30 airstrikes struck Aleppo on Saturday alone.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a British-based monitoring group, says around 250 civilians have been killed in the Aleppo region since the most recent bought of fighting began on April 22 between government and rebel forces, The Guardian reports.

Over the course of the civil war between Syrian and government forces, which has just entered its fifth year, estimates say that hundreds of thousands of people have been killed and millions more displaced.

Later during his post-Regina Caeli address, Pope Francis commended an Italian initiative for its work in fighting against the abuse of minors in all its forms.

Child abuse “is a tragedy!” the Pope said. “We must not tolerate child abuse!” He expressed his gratitude for the “Meter Onlus” Association, an organization founded in 1989 to work for the rights of children and combating abuse.  

“We must defend the children and we must severely punish the abusers,” the pontiff said. “Thank you for your commitment, and continue courageously in this work!”

Turning to the themes of the environment and employment, Pope Francis acknowledged an upcoming international conference in Rome entitled: "Sustainable development and the most vulnerable forms of employment."

He expressed his hope that Monday's conference may “alert the authorities, political and economic institutions and civil society,” in order to “promote a model of development that takes into account human dignity, in full respect of labor standards and the environment.”

Before leading the crowds in the Regina Caeli prayer, Pope Francis reflected on the day's Gospel reading which recounts Jesus, at the Last Supper, foretelling the coming of the Holy Spirit.

The pontiff notes that the Holy Spirit's mission to deepen the disciples' understanding of the Gospel as they spread proclaim it throughout the world, and to “awaken the memory” of Jesus' words.

While Jesus “already communicated everything he wanted to entrust to the Apostles with Him, the Word incarnate,” the Pope said, the Holy Spirit reminds them how to put these teachings into practice in “concrete circumstances of life.”

“It is precisely what is happening today in the Church,” the Pope continued. The Church is “guided by the light and strength of the Holy Spirit, in order that it may bring to everyone the gift of salvation: that is, the love and mercy of God.”

“We are not alone: Jesus is near us, among us, within us!” Pope Francis said. It is through the gift of the Holy Spirit that we “can establish a living relationship with Him, the Crucified and Risen One.”

“The Spirit, poured out in us through the sacraments of Baptism and Confirmation, it acts in our lives. He guides us in the way we think, act,” how to know the difference between write and wrong. “It helps us to practice charity of Jesus, his gift of self to others, especially those most in need.”

Vatican City, Apr 30, 2016 / 02:30 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Illuminated by the red light that spilled across Rome’s Trevi fountain, voices from persecuted Christian communities across the world shared the stories of friends and loved ones killed for the faith, and urged the world to take greater action in putting the violence to an end.

“Let us remember, tonight, the blood of the Christian martyrs, spilled by the violence of men and the sin of the world,” Cardinal Mauro Piacenza said April 29.

Quoting Pope Francis, he stressed that when confronted with the situation, “silence and secrecy are also sins.” 

He expressed his belief that the Christian martyrs of today are exercising “a real and vicarious atonement, through Christ, with Christ and in Christ, in favor of all men.”

“This is why, while we shake around them, crying with their families for their violent death, we raise to God a hymn of praise for these brothers who have entered into the glory of Paradise, with the palm of martyrdom in their hands and girded with a crown of glory.”

Cardinal Piacenza, head of the Apostolic Penitentiary and international president of Aid the Church in Need, spoke against the backdrop of Rome’s famous Trevi fountain – which was colored red in recognition of all the Christians around the world who daily continue to give their lives for the faith.

Organized by Aid to the Church in need, the event drew an international presence of Church leaders including Bishop Antonie Audo, Chaldean Bishop of Aleppo, Syria, and Syriac-Catholic Patriarch Ignatius Joseph III Younan, from Baghdad. 

Iraq and Syria are among the countries where Christians are severely persecuted, with the Islamic State killing, enslaving and driving people out of their homes. Christians in Nigeria are also at risk from attacks by the militant group Boko Haram, while Christianity is illegal in countries including North Korea and Somalia. 

Family and friends of Christians recently killed for their faith also gathered to share testimonies and the stories of their loved ones.

Among the speakers at the event were Professor Shahid Mobeen from Pakistan, founder of the Association for Pakistani Christians in Italy and a friend of Shahbaz Bhatti, who served as the federal minister for the minorities in Pakistan and was assassinated in 2011. The Diocese of Islamabad-Rawalpindi has begun collecting testimonies about Bhatti to inquire into his martyrdom and sanctity.

Other speakers present were Maddalena Santoro, the sister of Italian Fr. Andrea Santoro, who was killed in Turkey in 2006 as he was praying inside his church, and Luka Loteng, 25, from Kenya, who had several friends killed in the Garissa University massacre of Christian students in 2015.

A Missionaries of Charity sister who had been in formation with one of the sisters recently killed in Yemen was also present. 

In comments to CNA, the sister, who preferred to remain anonymous, recalled meeting fellow Missionary of Charity Sr. Judith in formation in Rome.

Sr. Judith was one of four Missionaries of Charity killed in a brutal attack on their convent in Yemen March 4. 

She and three other sisters – Sr. Anslem, Sr. Marguerite and Sr. Reginette – were murdered along with 16 other victims, including volunteers from Ethiopia and Yemen, when gunmen stormed their convent claiming to have relatives living there. Each victim was found handcuffed and shot in the head.

The sister who spoke with CNA recalled how she had spent one year with Sr. Judith at the formation house in Rome, and that she was “very joyous, like all from Africa, and always willing to help.”

“She was very kind and full of life. We also organized apostolates together. She was a very beautiful sister, very joyful,” she said.

Although she was nervous to give her testimony since she is not used to public speaking, the sister said the event at the Trevi fountain is “a beautiful testimony” of Pope Francis’ constant references to “the martyrs of today.”

“The world is not so much in contact with the recent news, and maybe they don’t want to be, so he’s putting it into the light.”

Bishop Audo also voiced his hope that the event would help draw attention to the growing persecution of Christians worldwide.

In an interview with CNA, he said that lighting up such a well-known monument in Rome is “something very new and very courageous. It gives us strength in a context of difficulty and departure.”

“To have such meetings and such declarations in one of the most important places in Rome is a local and international message. It really moves me.” 

The bishop expressed his admiration for those who both organized and spoke at the event, and said that “small things” such as this that will “help to change the world.”

Bishop Audo’s diocese of Aleppo has been the site of increased hostility amid Syria’s ongoing civil war, already in its fifth year. 

Violence in the city reached a fever-pitch on Thursday when an airstrike on a pediatric hospital killed 50 people, including several children and doctors.

According to CNN, the Al Quds field hospital, run by Doctors Without Borders and the Red Cross, was hit by a missile from a fighter jet Wednesday night, claiming the lives of at least three children and three doctors, one of whom was the last pediatrician in the city.

Bishop Audo called the attack “a drama,” and questioned the reasoning behind it, asking “why a hospital? Why children? I don’t understand this.”

However, he stressed that just because it made international news doesn’t mean it’s an isolated event. These type of attacks happen “every day, every hour, everywhere in Syria.”

The world has to become aware of this, he said, instead of using the media “to make some propaganda for a serious event. This issue is bigger than a hospital.”

In his personal opinion, the bishop said a political solution to the conflict is both possible and important, but voiced his belief that “there are those who don’t want a political solution.”

Certain powers “want the destruction of Syria to divide the country and each one takes a piece for themselves. This is the problem, this is the deeper motive,” he said, but stressed that this is just his personal opinion.

What Christians there really want is peace, “so that there won’t be any more bombs, when there will no longer be people leaving their homes, their countries, to go across the sea and across the border,” he said, explaining that “small events” like the coloring of the Trevi fountain “help to have and to give consciousness, to inspire action.”

“Christian persecution is a risk of persecution of everyone. We defend the Christians to defend the dignity of every man, everywhere,” the bishop said, and urged prayers for peace.

“We must pray, and also an international level perhaps to put their efforts to understand the stability of Syria and the stability of the Middle East for the entire world,” he said, adding that these problems are solved “with dialogue and not with weapons.”
 

Site Mailing List 
Go out to the whole world and proclaim the Good News

Catholic Homilies
another webiste by frnick.com